Animex Scholarship Winner Announcement



Congratulations to the Animex Scholarship Winners!!


We are happy to announce that this wonderful company, Animex Fencing, that provides a student scholarship to us for attendance to the Western Section Annual Meeting, will be supporting not only graduate student Ellie Bolas, but two undergraduate students she works with. Let's learn about these three exceptional students!

Ellie Bolas (seen with Spotted Skunk and in lab) is finishing a Master's of Science in the Graduate Group of Ecology and Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology at UC Davis. Outside of her studies on endemic species such as the island fox (Urocyon littoralis) and the island spotted skunk (Spilogale gracilis amohiala), Ellie is an avid advocate for expanding access to science education and public interest in the outside world! Her application also included the ambition to help two of her interns, Miroslava Munguia Ramos and Andy Lee, both seniors at UC Davis attend the event as well, so let's find out more about them and what they hope to gain from the experience. Miroslava Munguia Ramos [in the Serengeti!] is a senior at UCD majoring in Environmental Science and Management with a minor in Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology. As an intern, she sorted and labeled thousands of wildlife camera images to assist with research on resource selection and status of island spotted skunks. Miroslava is also the Co-President for UCD's Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity, and Sustainability (S.E.E.D.S.). Andy Lee [seen with Channel Islands Fox and in lab] is a senior at UCD majoring in Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology. Andy's internship contributes to research on the evolutionary history of island spotted skunks and he is involved in field and lab work and data analysis to help compile a mitogenome for island spotted skunks. Andy is also an accomplished photographer. INTERVIEW: What are you and your interns hoping to gain from the meeting? Ellie: I’m looking forward to presenting findings from my master’s research on the status of island spotted skunks and to re-connecting with some friends and fellow researchers. Also, I’m really excited to help Miroslava and Andy connect with some of the great scientists from TWS-WS with whom they may want to work in the future! Miroslava: I'm most excited to be exposed to all the opportunities available within the realm of wildlife ecology and conservation.  Andy: I am hoping to learn more about different topics of research in wildlife ecology. I'm also very excited to meet different professors, researchers, and students.  Which program topics are you most interested in learning about? Ellie: I always enjoy hearing about new advances in research during the concurrent sessions. I’m also really looking forward to the plenary session this year. I study rare species that are vulnerable to extinction, so the plenary topic is particularly relevant. Additionally, I have a secret love of Pleistocene ecology and am eager to learn more from Dr. Mychajliw! Miroslava: I'm looking forward to the Wildlife Career Symposium and the Yosemite Workshop/Field Trip Case Studies to see how to get started and continue working in national parks. Andy: I'm most interested in the Ecology and Conservation of Mammals, but I'm also excited about all the topics regarding the Anthropocene.  What else does 2019 have in store for you? Ellie: I’m looking forward to finishing my master’s, hopefully publishing a paper or two, and beginning my PhD. Miroslava: Besides graduation, my goal is to promote citizen science and get friends and family back home excited about nature and the environment. Andy: I'm finishing my undergrad this year, and hope to land a job and start my career as an ecologist!

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The Wildlife Society (TWS), founded in 1937, is an international non-profit scientific and educational association dedicated to excellence in wildlife stewardship through science and education. The Society’s mission is “To inspire, empower, and enable wildlife professionals to sustain wildlife populations and habitats through science-based management and conservation.”

© 2019 by The SF Bay Area Chapter of The Wildlife Society